Weekly Spotlight: swisscleantech

Working Toward a Cleantech Role Model Economy

Written by Brian Hicks
Posted October 10, 2011

swisscleantech is a Cleantech Business Association founded in 2009 by the Foundation For Global Sustainability (FFGS), located in Zurich, Switzerland.

swisslcleantech works to bundle the interests of their 250-plus member companies to reach two goals: policy development, and business innovation and collaboration within Switzerland and worldwide.swisscleantech

swisscleantech, one of the founding members of the GCCA, aims to support the transition of the Swiss economy into a cleantech role model. In a cleantech role-model economy, Swiss companies will benefit from rapidly-growing markets and the ensuing demand for sustainable products and services.

Swiss companies across all industries are considered members of the cluster. Each member has direct online access and can take part in the debate and the decision-making processes of the association.

A patronage committee headed by Bertrand Piccard (SolarImpulse) and three advisory boards support members in this decision-making:

  • the political advisory board, including members of both Houses of Parliament of all major parties;
  • the advisory board (including specific NGOs); and
  • the scientific advisory board (multiple disciplines)

swisscleantech favors a sustainable Swiss economic policy which embraces economic, social, and ecological conditions, and thus acknowledges the interdependence of economic, social, and environmental factors. Instead, a lean and clean framework should provide incentives for long-term planning and new investments.

swisscleantech's key topics include the following:

  • Regional and national economic policy: Cleantech should become a pillar of the Swiss economy, sustain long-term competitive advantage, enable Eco-Innovation, promote medium-sized enterprises, promote exports, and initiate innovative parks.
  • International positioning: Switzerland should strive to become a leader in international negotiations on regulations and position itself as a role model in all aspects of sustainability.
  • Innovation: Switzerland should promote innovation in key areas, enable startup companies in cleantech sectors, and encourage clusters.
  • Environment (climate, natural resources, waste): Switzerland should set up lean and clean long-term regulations, leaving implementation of solutions to the economy and maintaining leadership in climate policy/CO2/resource management.
  • Energy: Switzerland should foster international cooperation, promote renewable energy, improve efficiency (e.g. quality and standards in construction), guarantee supply, and enhance local value creation.
  • Mobility (transport): Switzerland should implement an integrated policy for urban development and transport, long-term investment for infrastructure, resource-friendly mobility (public and individual transport, electric powered transportation).
  • Agriculture: Switzerland should strive for international leadership and set high standards for ecologically-produced food, and use waste land for energy production (photovoltaic, wind, etc.)
  • Urban development: Switzerland should pursue integrated urban and landscape development (energy, mobility), centers with high density of buildings, and natural reserves for biodiversity and for recreation.

More exciting news for 2011 includes a number of their member companies being nominated for the GCCA Later Stage Award:

Until Next Time,

Angela Guss